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rod178
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Location: Australia

Post by rod178 » Tue Aug 25, 2009 2:30 pm

Have you any links to the use of splitters / switches

thanks
rod

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TheFug
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Location: The Netherlands, North-Holland

Post by TheFug » Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:22 pm

You really don't need that, you must see a switch as a couple/connecting point, say , you have a shortage of network/LAN connections, or where you have an pc, and you want to place a second pc next to it, you pull out the UTP cable of the first pc, plug this cable in the switch, plug a short UTP cable in the switch, and the other end in the second pc, and another short cable for the first pc again, it's that simple, in one of the other ports of the switch, you can plug in a IP-phone, maybe an extra WiFi access point, to have a larger coverage area for laptops, etc....
it's really easy, so you don't have to lay wires from a faraway router... infrastructure wise, you can expand in a better way, and you place these switches as you like, it's just plug and... go.
Your original router in your network, hands out the IP addresses.
So you only have to plug, and you don't have to set anything, you can add all kind of network devices this way, no instructions needed !
If you have a Gigaswitch, you can also stream High Definition video between these connections.
(normal switches have a 10/100Mbit, Gigabit=1000Mbit)
Last edited by TheFug on Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Thanks, The Fug.

gear: my ISP's Zyxel Modem/Router in bridge, Sitecom WL309 Router, Siemens Gigaset 301D

sirmikey1
Posts: 157
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Post by sirmikey1 » Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:39 pm

You are basically connecting many individual networks via the uplink port and/or the use of a switch. The router just takes a single channel and splits it into several channels, one for every PC.


http://images.google.com/images?q=hub%20router%20switch

MIkey

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TheFug
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Location: The Netherlands, North-Holland

Post by TheFug » Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:14 pm

When you're talking about "uplink" you're talking about an ethernet-hub,
that's a forerunner of the switch, a ethernet-hub needs extra configuration of an online pc, to be able to share internet, so forget about an ethernet hub,
or there should be a really good reason to use one, but i can't imagine, in this time and age....
A switch is just easy to use, it just needs a mains adapter to operate, the switch has a certain amount of ports, you choose a model with the right amount of ports for your needs, any brand will do i guess, because it just "ports" your network traffic in both ways, also it detects which type of UTP configured cable you use, so this will always works correctly.
So, by example: if you got an simple "provider" modem, with only one LAN port, you buy a cheap switch and you are ready, the modem already has router and firewall software build-in.
But if you have a separate ATA, you place the ATA between the modem and switch, this way you have no NAT problems with SIP switching.
(keep track if the ATA has also a router (or not) function, if it has, most of the time it's better to use this router function because it will take special care of the SIP traffic...and will set the priorities "straight" for a good functioning network.
Thanks, The Fug.

gear: my ISP's Zyxel Modem/Router in bridge, Sitecom WL309 Router, Siemens Gigaset 301D

sirmikey1
Posts: 157
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 11:19 pm

Post by sirmikey1 » Wed Aug 26, 2009 5:13 pm

Fug,

The last port auto negotiates to either patch cable (uplink) or straight through. Some models have a push button, but this is automatic.

Here's a large image:
http://www.advantage.co.nz/images/3755.JPG

Mikey

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TheFug
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Location: The Netherlands, North-Holland

Post by TheFug » Wed Aug 26, 2009 6:13 pm

So you could call it an extra feature on this type of switch ? and no configuration is needed, hence the "auto" feature...
but why should one have need for an uplink feature ?
a simple switch is enough for me, what is the advantage of the uplink feature ?
Thanks, The Fug.

gear: my ISP's Zyxel Modem/Router in bridge, Sitecom WL309 Router, Siemens Gigaset 301D

rod178
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 12:41 pm
Location: Australia

Post by rod178 » Thu Aug 27, 2009 1:22 am

TheFug wrote:You really don't need that, you must see a switch as a couple/connecting point, say , you have a shortage of network/LAN connections, or where y .....
:lol:

My mistake I thought that the 'switches' you referred to were a new software feature of SS. I searched for a reference in the Forum. No wonder I could not find anything. :roll:

sirmikey1
Posts: 157
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 11:19 pm

Post by sirmikey1 » Thu Aug 27, 2009 2:21 am

Fug,

This link is well worth Reading.

Switches are very smart (process data), while hubs are dumb (no processing). The uplink port is where you would plug another hub, switch or router...

What is an Ethernet Switch?
http://www.tech-faq.com/ethernet-switch.shtml

Mikey

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TheFug
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Post by TheFug » Sat Aug 29, 2009 4:51 pm

Yep, that's it, i only mentioned the most important features.
an unmanaged is enough most of the time, for a regular user, using them, made life easy for me here with the stuff i use.
Thanks, The Fug.

gear: my ISP's Zyxel Modem/Router in bridge, Sitecom WL309 Router, Siemens Gigaset 301D

sirmikey1
Posts: 157
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 11:19 pm

Post by sirmikey1 » Sat Aug 29, 2009 5:57 pm

Fug,
I'm using my switch in the most odd position, and I really don't even know why I'm doing this. I have my cable modem in the uplink port and my pc in the other port. My ISP tells me that they cannot see me online, that I'm offline. Hey, works for me....
Mikey

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